PowerPoint Notes

Info-things on PowerPoint usage including tips, techniques and tutorials.

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Wednesday, June 26, 2019, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

by Echo Swinford

Yesterday I did a rush cleanup job on a nasty deck of slides for a client, and today, I got a thank you email that said:

There is one thing I must ask you. How do you get your tables to format with such a light design (the lines of the table)? I have tried to figure out how to do this but usually end up picking one from the design menu in the tool bar because I can’t reformat the colors of the actual table lines.

So this is what I do to get the light-colored lines:

  1. What I usually do first is select the table. Then I access the Table Design tab of the Ribbon, and remove all the Shading (the paint bucket icon), and choose the No Fill option (highlighted in red in Figure 1).
  2. PowerPoint Tables 01
    Figure 1: Choose the No Fill option
  3. If this does not help, access the Table Styles gallery. If you click the bottom arrow at the right of the gallery, you can expand the entire Table Styles gallery and see all styles. There is a plain style at the very top called No Style, No Grid (see Figure 2). You could also start with this style to strip out all the ugly formatting in one fell swoop.
  4. PowerPoint Tables 02
    Figure 2: Choose the No Style, No Grid option
  5. If your text color was white to start with, you may have to change the text color after you remove the background. We end up with something similar to what you see in Figure 3, below (compare with Figure 1).
  6. PowerPoint Tables 03
    Figure 3: Table with No Style, No Grid style
  7. Then I change the border color. It’s labeled Pen Color. With the Table selected, I use a light grey. This is usually the first or second chip down in the white column, as shown in Figure 4, below.
  8. PowerPoint Tables 04
    Figure 4: Choose the first or second chip down in the white column
  9. Then I apply the light border using the Border icon (see Figure 5) beneath the paint bucket (Shading) option. I generally apply the inside horizontal borders, but even if I need other borders, I try to keep them as minimal as possible. Sometimes you have to click a border to turn it on before you can turn it off.
  10. PowerPoint Tables 05
    Figure 5: Choose inside horizontal borders
  11. You can see the finished table in Figure 6, below.
  12. PowerPoint Tables 06
    Figure 6: Finished table

Echo Swinford
  
A Microsoft PowerPoint MVP since 2000, Echo Swinford began her PowerPoint career in 1997. She holds a master's degree in new media from the Indiana University School of Informatics and is the owner of Echosvoice, a PowerPoint consulting firm specializing in custom template development, presentation creation, makeovers and cleanup, and training for large and small corporate clients. Echo has written and co-written five PowerPoint books, developed a number of video publications, and has a string of tech editing credits to her name. She is the President of the Presentation Guild, a not-for-profit trade association for the presentation industry.

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Friday, June 21, 2019, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

By AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra

Presentation Management: The New Strategy for Enterprise ContentThis post is part of a series on Presentation Management, and is the sixth post in this series.

Here are links to the previous posts:

  1. Presentation Management: Ending the Tangled Mess of PowerPoint?
  2. Presentation Management: What’s Wrong With PowerPoint (As If You Didn’t Know Already)
  3. Presentation Management: Visual Storytelling
  4. Presentation Management: Introducing the Discipline
  5. Presentation Management: Why Is It Important Now

This set of serialized posts is based on original content, the Presentation Management: The New Strategy for Enterprise Content book, authored by AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra.

When we talk about presenters in this book, we are referring to people who want to drive action. In business, this is often the salesperson, but it really can be any leader in the company. Leaders at all levels, from middle management to the C-suite, need to motivate people to act.

Empowering Presenters

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Friday, June 14, 2019, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

Did you know that there is an unspoken fact in the presentations’ world? This fact is that nearly half, or even more, of the PowerPoint presentations, and presentations created in other programs are not going to be projected onscreen and presented in a boardroom or a conference venue, or even used in a webinar.

Really? Where did these presentations come from? The other half of all presentations created are internal business reports that contain millions of slides floating within the mail inboxes and other folders of most business, educational, and other entities.

So what is a business report presentation? It is everything your normal presentation isn’t, and business reports unabashedly flout every rule framed to create better presentations! Some examples of these rules are using less text, and respecting white space–and that happens even though you can create good business reports even after you follow all rules.

Now, before we proceed further, let me tell you that it is entirely possible to create business report slides that look good, are enjoyable to read, and use good aesthetic sense. Nancy Duarte created a simple framework within PowerPoint called SlideDocs that lets you create better business reports, but most business report slides don’t worry too much about looking good. They just need to get the job done!

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Thursday, June 6, 2019, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

By AlexAnndra Ontra, James Ontra, and Geetesh Bajaj

Presentation Management: The New Strategy for Enterprise ContentThis post is part of a series on Presentation Management, and is the fifth post in this series.

Here are links to the previous posts:

  1. Presentation Management: Ending the Tangled Mess of PowerPoint?
  2. Presentation Management: What’s Wrong With PowerPoint (As If You Didn’t Know Already)
  3. Presentation Management: Visual Storytelling
  4. Presentation Management: Introducing the Discipline

This set of serialized posts is based on original content, the Presentation Management: The New Strategy for Enterprise Content book, authored by AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra.

Three different waves of change are merging to profoundly affect how corporations operate:

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Thursday, May 23, 2019, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

By AlexAnndra Ontra, James Ontra, and Geetesh Bajaj

Presentation Management: The New Strategy for Enterprise ContentThis post is part of a series on Presentation Management, and is the fourth post in this series.

Here are links to the previous three posts:

  1. Presentation Management: Ending the Tangled Mess of PowerPoint?
  2. Presentation Management: What’s Wrong With PowerPoint (As If You Didn’t Know Already)
  3. Presentation Management: Visual Storytelling

This set of serialized posts is based on original content, the Presentation Management: The New Strategy for Enterprise Content book, authored by AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra.

You may agree with what we say, you may disagree, or you may partly agree. Either way, we want to hear your thoughts! Please do post your comments to make this post more engaging.

After looking at tangled mess that PowerPoint weaves, and exploring the concept of presentation management and how it helps visual storytelling, let us now look more closely at how presentation management can improve your workflow, life, and help you manage your visual assets.

The new discipline of presentation management can have an enormous impact on a company.

Presentation management takes presentations from one-and-done, single files and turns them into enterprise assets deployed intelligently throughout your organization.

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