PowerPoint Notes

Info-things on PowerPoint usage including tips, techniques and tutorials.

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Tuesday, November 24, 2020, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:45 am

Typically, NAS devices such as the ones from Synology are meant to be running all the time, but there may be times you want to shut them down. You may want to add a new HDD or add RAM, or you may just want to shut it down. In this post, I’ll look at how you can power up and shut down Synology’s DS920+ NAS device. However, this process works in almost the same way for all Synology devices.

Synology’s DS920+ NAS Device

Do you have hundreds of thousands of PowerPoint presentations, work files, or any other files that you need to be safely stored and accessed? Then you should look at a complete NAS device such as the Synology DS920+ NAS I reviewed a while ago.

Power Up the Synology NAS

To power up your Synology, you can press the Power button in the front, as shown in both the pictures below. The picture on the left shows a latent button and the picture on the right shows the button after the Synology NAS is powered on.

Power up Synology NAS

Power up Synology NAS

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Wednesday, November 11, 2020, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

If you are like other people who run a business, or even if you work from home in these lockdown times, you will find that you need tons of data accessible to you all the time. I know because I had to move so much data home because my office was shut down for more than a month during the lockdown days, and I needed all my data to ensure that my business was working smoothly. Yes, cloud storage is an amazing option but there are no unlimited storage options anymore online, and even if they existed, you don’t want to download twenty similar files to locate the one large file you needed.

And yes, I have several external hard drives and NAS from the likes of Seagate, Western Digital, and other providers&mdash:but they don’t last as much as they used to ten years ago! And I always use a RAID or at least more than one drive to store all data. So, if one of my drives go south, I only have one copy of the data left (and another copy on the cloud), but I need to get a replacement drive to ensure that the data is copied again and saved until I lose another drive!

There has to be a better option, and many of my business associates have recommended a more capable NAS solution such as the ones provided by Synology. So, when Synology contacted me to do a review of one of their newest NAS, I thought I could hit two birds with one stone. I could play with the Synology NAS solution and also get my backups in order. My contact at Synology was Andrew Huang. Thank you, Andrew, for patiently answering all my questions.

Andrew sent me a Synology DS920+ NAS.

Synology DS920+

Synology DS920+

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Monday, November 9, 2020, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

Original content by AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra
Enhanced by Geetesh Bajaj

In the last part of this Presentation Management series of posts, we explored sharing and presenting options. In this part, we look at the last three aspects of a presentation’s life cycle: social engagement, reporting, and updating.

Social Sharing

PowerPoint is going social!

Kristin Shevis, Chief Customer Officer for Clarifai, exclaimed back in 2018, when we first explained the social capability of our Shufflrr app.

It’s like Facebook or Instagram except the subject matter is your presentation content instead of your vacation pictures. (Yeah, I know, I’d prefer to see sandy beaches over org charts any day.) Users can follow, like, rate, comment, and converse about files and slides.

Here are some more aspects of using social engagement:

  • Social provides spontaneous feedback in The Wheel, helping to improve the content’s quality for its next evolution.
  • When you are collaborating with colleagues, you can see their comments directly on the slide or the file they affect, and then you can respond. Permissioned users can also see the conversation thread, so everyone can understand the context of the file and see how and why it evolved to its latest iteration.
  • On an enterprise level, users can give direct feedback to their presentation team about the content in real-time. They can write a quick comment about what’s good on a slide, or bad, or how a client reacted in a meeting given 15 minutes ago. It helps the presentation director assess the quality of the content, what’s resonating in the field and why, and provides direction for edits and updates going forward.
  • Social also provides a means to give input and share knowledge among the entire group, rather than waiting for that next big status meeting. And let’s be honest, by the time that status meeting comes around, you’ve forgotten about that slide anyway.

That’s why presentation management has commenting and other social features built-in, to keep the feedback loop continual and timely.

Social Engagement

Social Engagement

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Wednesday, October 21, 2020, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 10:00 am

Original content by AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra
Enhanced by Geetesh Bajaj

In the last part of this Presentation Management series of posts, we looked at the distribution of presentation content. In this part, we look at two more aspects of a presentation’s life cycle: sharing and presenting.

Sharing

Sharing refers to how you share or send files to your clients and other third parties outside of your organization. This is especially important for sales, marketing, and investor relations. Those presentations directly affect the company’s image and bottom line.

This may appear like a seemingly mundane task, but it has huge implications for productivity. Files with images and videos tend to get too large and will be stripped from most corporate email systems. The file-size limit is different for every organization, so you don’t really know if your file will get through or not. Sharing gives media ad sales reps an easy way to send large video files to advertisers. Travel clients have high-resolution pictures and videos in their presentations, too. Anyone in any industry can have big files. The process of sharing these presentations is simple:

  1. Choose one or more files. They could be large PDFs, PowerPoints, images, or videos, it doesn’t matter, as long as they tell the right story.
  2. Click on Share, input your customer’s email address and within seconds your customer can view the files. Like YouTube. It’s instantaneous.

Then, you can track the consumption of the files. Did my client open it, download it, read it, ignore it–or maybe she just never received it? It’s productive to know how engaged your client is with the information you share because that will tell you how interested they are, and then help guide your next steps.

Sharing Files

Sharing Files

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Thursday, September 24, 2020, posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 am

Original content by AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra
Enhanced by Geetesh Bajaj

In the last part of this Presentation Management series of posts, we looked at the lifecycle of a presentation, including its creation. In this part, we look at another aspect of a presentation’s life cycle: its distribution.

Yes, you or someone else created the presentation content. That brings forth some questions:

  • Where will the content reside?
  • How will it be accessed?
  • Who gets access?
  • How do users find the specific content they need?

These questions are all related to distribution in presentation management. Now, let us answer the questions one at a time.

Where is the Content?

The content is wherever you save it. It could be on individual computers, a company network, or even on individual cloud accounts. None of these scenarios are ideal because they prevent access to many who need to use the content.

The best solution is to host the content on the cloud because that’s where users can get to it, whether they are sitting inside corporate headquarters or working from home.

Most of our clients subscribe to our hosting service. But there are a few who prefer to keep their content on the premises, in which case they install Shufflrr on their own cloud. The goal is to make sure users can get content, anywhere, anytime, from any device. There’s nothing more frustrating than sitting down at your desk to get some work done only to realize that you are locked out for some dumb reason.

– AlexAnndra Ontra and James Ontra, Shufflrr

How is Content Accessed?

Access begins with logging into the slide library. Users then find content through search and visualization. The quality of the slide library, visualization, content hierarchy, search and permissions will affect the ease or the difficulty with which users can successfully find what they need.

Where is the Content

Where is the Content

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