PowerPoint Notes

Info-things on PowerPoint usage including tips, techniques and tutorials.

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Monday, April 9, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

Slide titles are very important. First of all, they identify a slide. Secondly, they provide structure to your presentation, because anyone who uses PowerPoint’s Outline view will not be happy to see slides without titles, as shown in Figure 1, below. Look for the highlighted red areas–these are devoid of any titles.

Missing Slide Titles
Figure 1: Missing Slide Titles

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Wednesday, April 4, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

Animated GIFs used to be very popular like twenty, or twenty-five years ago, because they were small in size, and worked well in a lower-bandwidth world. They were created using multiple images, which were similar to each other, but still had some differences. As the images played like a flipbook, they provided an easy illusion of movement. And, as suddenly as they had become popular, the animated GIF faded away.

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Tuesday, February 20, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:45 AM IST

Millions of presentations are created, and you may have seen at least hundreds of presentations in your lifetime. Yet, how many of them do you remember a few days or weeks after you have seen them?

You may see the occasional, amazing slide that you remember, but for most of us who are not PowerPoint designers, the bad slides are similar to what a Google Images search for the same term shows up, as you can see in Figure 1, below.

Google Bad Slides
Figure 1: A search for ‘bad slides’ on Google Images

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Friday, January 26, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

Introduction

Did you receive a PDF from someone that needs to be converted into a PowerPoint presentation? Or did you lose the original PowerPoint file, and only have a PDF version left? Maybe you received an InDesign or Quark file that needs to do double-duty as a PowerPoint deck? Or there may be any number of reasons to create an editable PowerPoint slide deck from a PDF.

Products that create PowerPoint presentations from PDFs are aplenty, and Adobe’s own Acrobat Pro XI or a newer version can do the trick. But when you need something more than just basic conversion, you can look at PDFelement 6 Pro. What’s so special about PDFelement 6 Pro? To start with, did you know that if your PDF has scanned pictures of text, other products will retain the picture as it is within the converted PowerPoint file. But PDFelement 6 Pro can also convert the text within a picture into editable text so that you don’t have to type it all over again!

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Thursday, January 25, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:45 AM IST

Originally, this started with a discussion in an internal group exploring solutions that would allow one click on a remote to advance two presentations at the same time. Why would anyone want two presentations to move ahead at the same time?

There are many reasons why presenters may want to move to the next slide in two decks at the same time:

  1. Language: If you are presenting to a multilingual audience, you may want to present the same content in two languages.
  2. Design: Much like spanning your desktop machine on two displays, you may have design reasons to provide symmetrical displays on two opposite ends. While the designs may be similar, they could still be flipped, continuous, or even entirely different.
  3. Accessibility: You may have to design slides differently if your audience comprises of people with opposing disabilities.

Whatever your reasons may be, you would need to proceed to the next slide on both presentations simultaneously.

Troy ChollarPowerPoint MVP, Troy Chollar offered not one but two solutions.

“I do this all the time. It is a matter of having a single remote with 2 receivers. Not all remotes can do this. Here are my two recommendations.”

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Thursday, January 25, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

A few days ago, I needed to demo some animation effects in a training class. I happened to open one of my older presentation decks, and this one was probably created using PowerPoint 2002 or 2003. The animation was just what I needed. With a few tweaks, this deck could save me hours of work. There was just one small problem. The slides were all 4:3 Standard resolution, and the new deck needed to be 16:9 Widescreen resolution.

Figure 1, below shows one of the slides from the old deck.

Old Deck Before Slide Slide
Figure 1: Slide before using the Slide Size command

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Tuesday, January 2, 2018
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

We explored how you can add 3D objects in PowerPoint using the new 3D feature available to Microsoft Office 365 subscribers. But until now, any movement happened using the Morph transition effect.

So what does “movement only through Morph” mean? It means that you could not animate the 3D object in 3D space without Morph. Any movement in 3D space was only possible using a Morph transition, and the biggest disadvantage of this approach was that you needed to duplicate your slide for any movement to occur. For a reasonably adventurous concept, you may even need more than two slides. I remember creating something with 3D models that spanned 5 slides, all with the Morph transition applied.

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Wednesday, December 27, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

A reader once described the PowerPoint double-byte font scare as a poisonous king cobra snake! Sooner or later, you will see PowerPoint look at you like a cobra that’s showing its fangs, and is ready to bite. You want to make sure you are not bitten, and wouldn’t it be nice if the cobra quietly goes back to its hole and rests there in peace and leaves you alone?

Yes, there’s some play happening here between the words byte and bite!

Snake 1904343
Image: Pixabay

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Friday, December 15, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

You all know that you can easily change the font for any selected text in PowerPoint, by choosing any installed font on your system. But did you know that you can use fonts that don’t exist on your system!

This is either a trick or a bug and is similar to the analogy of a glass, half full. Some would complain about the glass being half-empty while others would be satisfied with the glass being half-full! In other words, this is a two-edged sword.

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Wednesday, December 13, 2017
posted by Geetesh Bajaj at 9:30 AM IST

This has been a frustrating issue for many PowerPoint users, and also users of other Office programs. You type some text that is sentence case, but the results are all capital case! Yes, you can use the Change Case option, but why should you have to do so for each slide?

One reason why you may get all capital letters is that you may be using a font that has no lowercase. Some fonts such as Castellar, Copperplate, and Engravers MT don’t have lowercase letters at all. And these fonts are installed by some versions of Microsoft products such as Office.

But let us assume that you are not using any such font. Then why do you get all uppercase? The answer is not too obvious, and to understand why this happens, you must know that there are two ways to add capitalized text in Microsoft Office programs:

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