Close Linked Presentations

Here’s a question I was recently asked.

I created a training PowerPoint presentation that has links to other PowerPoint presentation. But when I am finished the other linked PowerPoints, they are still open. Is there a way to have them close when you link back to the original one?

The answer is quite simple, but not very obvious. Here are some guidelines that will help:

  • You need not link back from the linked presentation — to the original one. In fact, make sure you do not do so!
  • Now you only have a one-way link from the original, source presentation to the destination presentation.
  • Click the link from the original, source presentation to the destination presentation.
  • Play the destination presentation. When you are done, simply press the Esc key on your keyboard to close the destination presentation.
  • Once the destination presentation is closed, you will be landed right back to your original, source presentation. In fact, you will get back to the same slide from where you linked!

Do explore some of our linking tutorials:

Linking Between Slides in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows | Linking to Another Presentation in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows | Linking to Web Pages in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows


Add Circular Text to Target Diagrams (any Shape) in PowerPoint 2010 for Windows

Received a question from an Indezine reader: Can you help me? I have built a target diagram using your tutorial (Thank You for this). However, I now am trying to write text within each of the target rings. Is it possible to shape the text to circular text?

Sure you can! Follow these steps:

  1. Select the circle for which you want to add circular text. Type some text — by default the text is inserted right at the middle of the circle as shown in the Figure below.
  2. With the circle still selected, access the Drawing Tools Format tab of the Ribbon. In the WordArt Styles group, locate the Text Effects button and click it to bring up a drop-down gallery. In this gallery, choose the Transform option, as shown in the Figure below.

    This opens a sub-gallery — within the Follow Path category, choose the top left option, as shown in the Figure above.

  3. Your text will not be in a circular style just below the top edge of your circle, as shown in the Figure below.


Select Multiple Objects in PowerPoint 2003

I’ll tell you an easy way to get frustrated, and an easier way to overcome it!

Get hold of a PowerPoint slides that has many animated slide objects that overlay each other. Now select the object stacked right at the bottom of the other objects. Does this have to be so difficult?

To select objects that are not too easy to access, you should use the Select Multiple Objects tool (if you use PowerPoint 2007, this does not apply to you). If you haven’t heard of this animal, I won’t blame you because it’s not visible by default. First you need to customize your Drawing toolbar to see this option:

  1. If the Drawing toolbar is not visible, choose View | Toolbars | Drawing.
  2. Then choose View | Toolbars | Customize. This will summon the Customize dialog box that you can see in Figure 1.

    Customize Toolbars in PowerPoint (01)
    Figure 1: Customize

  3. Now select the Drawing category in the left pane, and the Select Multiple Objects option in the right pane. Drag this option to the Drawing toolbar, as shown in Figure 2.

    Customize Toolbars in PowerPoint (02)
    Figure 2: Drag the icon to the toolbar

  4. Click Close to exit the Customize dialog box.
  5. Now when you have too many objects on a slide, just click the Select Multiple Objects option, and you’ll see the dialog box that you can see in Figure 3.

    Customize Toolbars in PowerPoint (03)
    Figure 3: Select Multiple Objects

  6. You can now select one or more objects on the slide — and you can also select any object on the slide!

Note: PowerPoint MVP Shyam Pillai creates the Shape Console add-in that adds a miniature floating window inside PowerPoint — this displays the current selected shape on the slide. Shape Console is a free download.


PPT vs. PPS (or PPTX vs. PPSX)

Quite often, you might have received a PowerPoint presentation with a PPS or PPSX extension rather than the normal PPT or PPTX extension – here’s more info.

First, let me tell you a little about the extensions:

  • PPT is the default file extension for saving presentations in PowerPoint 2003 and earlier versions.
  • PPTX is the default file extension for saving presentations in PowerPoint 2007 and later versions.
  • PPS is the the show mode extension in PowerPoint 2003 and earlier — these files run in “play-presentation” mode when double-clicked.
  • PPSX does the same thing in PowerPoint 2007 and later — it runs in “play-presentation” mode when double-clicked.

Here’s some more details that might help you clear the gobbledygook:

  • Technically there is no difference between PPT (or PPTX) and PPS (or PPSX) files.
  • With PPT and PPS files, you can actually rename the extensions whenever you want and the presentation file will remain the same.
  • With PPTX and PPSX files, you cannot rename at will — but trust me, they are the same!

The difference lies in how PowerPoint treats them:

  • By default, PPT and PPTX files open in edit mode within PowerPoint allowing you to use all the menus and commands.
  • By default, PPS and PPSX files open in slideshow (play-presentation) mode, and you see no PowerPoint interface. When the presentation finishes or you manually exit using tthe ESC key, PowerPoint also quits.

Having said that, you can play all PowerPoint file formats (PPT, PPS, PPTX, PPSX) directly from within Windows Explorer — right-click the file and the choose the Play option in the context menu.

You can also edit a PPS or PPSX file without changing the extension using either of these options:

  • Just drag and drop the PPS or PPSX file from Windows Explorer into an empty PowerPoint window.
  • Launch PowerPoint and open a PPS or PPSX using the File/Office Button | Open option to edit a presentation.

See Also: PowerPoint Tutorials | PowerPoint Tutorials: Interface and Basics





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since November 02, 2000